Industrial Age Economy

09 Nov 2015

Is there anything that can’t be Monetized?

in Currencies, Deep Wealth, Industrial Age Economy, Money

Putting all of nature into the economic meat grinder to make money[This question was asked by Rachel Haywire in a private Facebook group where I occasionally participate. I'd like to share my answer, because I think it's important in understanding the nature of monetization - what it's good for, and what it's not.]

I'd like to reframe just a bit. There are many things that *should not* be monetized or commoditized, but if we peel back our veil of justifications and self-delusions about money, we fundamentally use money (as configured today) as gambling tokens for speculative wealth. So then your question becomes, "Is there anything that somebody isn't willing to place gambling stakes on?" And the answer becomes more obvious. "No. Some idiot will be willing to price/gamble on/monetize just about anything." Of course, that is not to say such a price is a reflection of its real value or worth, just its current standing in a particular gambling market.

Many things have no value to a particular person at a precise time in a specific context. Every system of valuation (currency) is contextual valuing some things and not others, for example, day care has dollar value in our economy, stay-at-home-parenting does not.

08 Apr 2009

Value, Values and the New Economy

in Currents, Flow, Industrial Age Economy, New Economy, Value

[Reposted from New Currency Frontiers]

 

Currently value is primarily associated with scarcity. Things like breathable air and drinkable water do not become valuable until they are scarce. This is clearly a problem if we want to have values which reflect the real value of things within a living system.

Also, our models of wealth are completely upside down. Real wealth (derived from "weal" referring to wellness) is not a function of how much stuff you can accumulate. This is like thinking that becoming as fat as possible is to be healthy, or that cancer is a model for healthy systems. (Cancer uses all of its resources to grow more cancer until it kills its host.)